Feminism alive and kicking in the North East!!

http://www.nefeministgathering.com/

Last weekend saw feminists of the North East gather for a truly unique event in Newcastle – a ‘DIY’ weekend of discussion, skills-shares, creative activities and political rejuvenation.  

The warmth and energy that the organisers of the North East Feminist Gathering brought to their planning and execution of the weekend spread to all of the women who attended.  I have rarely experienced a more supportive, respectful space with a genuinely intergenerational mingling of women learning from one another and forging connections and networks.  

 

And, in case you were wondering, this is what a feminist looks like:

 

 

 

        

Last weekend saw feminists of the North East gather for a truly unique event in Newcastle – a ‘DIY’ weekend of discussion, skills-shares, creative activities and political rejuvenation.

The warmth and energy that the organisers of the North East Feminist Gathering brought to their planning and execution of the weekend spread to all of the women who attended.  I have rarely experienced a more supportive, respectful space, where a genuine intergenerational mix of women were enabled to learn from one another and forge connections and networks. There will be many legacies left by this event and doubtless many actions taken by those 80 or so who attended it.

Chi Onwurah, Vera Baird and Finn Mackay were amongst the prominent women who gave gave their time to address the Gathering. The weekend was bookended by Helen Berry’s opening talk on iconic women throughout history and closed with an an absolutely brilliant performance by Climbing Poetree, a Brooklyn-based pair of performance poets (if you ever get a chance to see this duo – GO TO IT!).

THANK YOU to the organising committee for giving us the weekend!

Oh, in case you were wondering, in answer to that age-old question, this is what feminists look like these days:

http://www.nefeministgathering.com/

North East Feminist Gathering 13-14 Oct 2012

North East Feminist Gathering 13-14 Oct 2012

Dr Julie Scanlon and Dr Jacky Collins will be hosting a discussion at this fabulous feminist event happening in Newcastle THIS WEEKEND.  All are welcome.  See further details of the weekend at the link above.  

Our session will focus on the representation of lesbians in culture (literature, film, TV, media) from the second-wave to the present.

In a timely stealing of our title and our topic, there is a story by Anna Friel in today’s Independent on the significance of THAT Brookside kiss….

http://www.independent.co.uk/voices/comment/i-kissed-a-girl–and-i-like-how-far-weve-come-since-8201063.html

 

North East Feminist Gathering 13-14 Oct 2012

Dr Julie Scanlon and Dr Jacky Collins will be hosting a discussion at this fabulous feminist event happening in Newcastle THIS WEEKEND.  The weekend is a women-only event and all women are welcome.  See further details at the link above.

Our session will focus on the representation of lesbians in culture (literature, film, TV, media) from the second-wave to the present and is entitled ‘How Far Have We Come?’

In a timely stealing of our title and our topic, there is a story by Anna Friel in today’s Independent on the significance of THAT Brookside kiss….

http://www.independent.co.uk/voices/comment/i-kissed-a-girl–and-i-like-how-far-weve-come-since-8201063.html

BBC Newcastle – 1st October 2012

BBC Newcastle – 1st October 2012

One of our members, Dr Claire Nally, was on BBC Newcastle with Jonathan Miles  earlier in the week. Here is what she had to say.

One of our members, Dr Claire Nally, was on BBC Newcastle with Jonathan Miles earlier in the week, discussing *that* book, ‘Fifty Shades of Grey’. Here is what she had to say:

BBC Newcastle – 1st October 2012

Women in Business

We find ourselves looking at today’s Telegraph and wondering how helpful this article actually is – Secret Diary – Our Board Babe on Naked Ambition
Recourse to the Beauty Myth in order to promote women in business?  Yes, there is an endemic problem with women in high profile jobs – academia is no exception – but drawing any comparison to the sorts of female solidarity we might get in the gym seems peculiarly misplaced. As to ‘Board Babe’ – well, it seems denigrating in the extreme to address a professional woman and her career in such a fashion.
A better article out today in ‘The Irish Times’ provides a more dignified discussion – I’ve done the maths: there are too few women in science

But why this problem? Is it because women may have breaks in their career for family and childcare issues? Because universities are still bastions of male privilege? How do we address this? Answers on a postcard or in a monograph, please!